Devil Raiders exercise rapid global mobility skills at C-Strike

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joshua Kasper, 821st Contingency Response Squadron aerospace maintenance supervisor, marshalls a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 11, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearse potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joshua Kasper, 821st Contingency Response Squadron aerospace maintenance supervisor, marshalls a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 11, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearse potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 821st Contingency Response Group offload cargo from a C-5 Galaxy aircraft during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 09, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 821st Contingency Response Group offload cargo from a C-5 Galaxy aircraft during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 09, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Christopher Pavia,921st Contingency Response Squadron Maintenance Flight chief, helps set up a tent during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 09, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Christopher Pavia,921st Contingency Response Squadron Maintenance Flight chief, helps set up a tent during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 09, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Pike, 921st Contingency Response Squadron aerospace maintenance supervisor, marshalls in a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 15, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Pike, 921st Contingency Response Squadron aerospace maintenance supervisor, marshalls in a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 15, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

A C-17 Globemaster III aircraft sits on the parking ramp before a mission during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 16, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

A C-17 Globemaster III aircraft sits on the parking ramp before a mission during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 16, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Air Force Capt. David Nelson, 821st Contingency Response Group executive officer, radios back to the Air Transportation Operations Center during Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 11, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Air Force Capt. David Nelson, 821st Contingency Response Group executive officer, radios back to the Air Transportation Operations Center during Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Fort Carson Air Terminal, Colo., Sept. 11, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 821st Contingency Response Group offload cargo from a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at Gunnison-Crested Butte Regional Airport, Colo., Sept. 09, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearse potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 821st Contingency Response Group offload cargo from a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at Gunnison-Crested Butte Regional Airport, Colo., Sept. 09, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearse potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 821st Contingency Response Group load a 10K forklift onto a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at Gunnison-Crested Butte Regional Airport, Colo., Sept. 09, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 821st Contingency Response Group load a 10K forklift onto a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 at Gunnison-Crested Butte Regional Airport, Colo., Sept. 09, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearsed potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Air Force Maj. John Fuccillo, an air mobility liaison officer with the 621st Mobility Support Operations Squadron assigned to the U.S. Army's 4th Infantry Division at Fort Carson, Colorado, communicates with C-130 Hercules crew members over the radio during Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Red Devil Landing Zone, Colorado, Sept. 12, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearse potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

U.S. Air Force Maj. John Fuccillo, an air mobility liaison officer with the 621st Mobility Support Operations Squadron assigned to the U.S. Army's 4th Infantry Division at Fort Carson, Colorado, communicates with C-130 Hercules crew members over the radio during Cerberus Strike 16-02 at the Red Devil Landing Zone, Colorado, Sept. 12, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearse potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

An Illinois Air National Guard C-130 Hercules aircraft lands at the Red Devil Landing Zone during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 on Fort Carson, Colorado, Sept. 12, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearse potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)
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An Illinois Air National Guard C-130 Hercules aircraft lands at the Red Devil Landing Zone during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02 on Fort Carson, Colorado, Sept. 12, 2016. C-Strike is a joint exercise where contingency response forces rehearse potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, aircraft engine running off-loads, communications, aerial port procedures, and air mobility liaison officer operations with airdrops from aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

TRAVIS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

Over the course of ten days Airmen from the 621st Contingency Response Wing utilized dirt runways and commercial airports to test their rapid global mobility skills during Exercise Cerberus Strike 16-02.

C-Strike is a contingency response centric mobility exercise occurring in locations throughout Colorado and Kansas. The exercise gave contingency response forces the opportunity to rehearse potential real-world situations by training with Army counterparts in cargo uploading and downloading on aircraft, communications, aircraft engine running off-loads, aerial port procedures and air mobility liaison officer operations.

“It’s our job in the CRW to push Air Mobility Command’s mobility mission to get passengers and cargo to the fight, and that’s what we tested here at C-Strike, said Lt. Col. Pat Rayner, 921st Contingency Response Squadron commander. “We have aerial porters putting cargo on airplanes, maintainers working on the aircraft, and command and control coordinating take off times and communicating with the aircrews.”

Exercises like C-Strike are important for contingency response Airmen because they provide an opportunity for them to work out any potential issues in a training environment.

“An exercise like this gives us the opportunity to see what we need to work on and what we are successful at,” Rayner said. “During the exercise we could see the importance of communication, both internal and external. How we work with our counterparts and how we communicate with ourselves from an intermediate staging base to four forward staging bases is tested during C-Strike.”

The exercise featured three different airframes with aircrews from Travis Air Force Base, California, Dover AFB, Delaware and Peterson AFB, Colorado also Air National Guard units from Illinois and Montana participated.

Along with the various Air Force units the exercise included Soldiers from the 4th Infantry Division, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team and the 43rd Sustainment Brigade.

“We are blessed to have three different airframes here at C-Strike, we are working with C-5s, C-17s and C-130s,” Raynor said. “We are also working with air mobility liaison officers tied into Soldiers from the 4th Infantry Division at Ft. Carson all in all creating an incredible joint exercise.”

“The exercise prepares contingency response Airmen to communicate more effectively with our joint counterparts and even our Air Force aircrew,” said Capt. David Nelson, 821st Contingency Response Group executive officer. “C-strike also paints a picture on how to build a team that will forward deploy smaller teams to multiple locations.”

 

 

 

Contingency response forces are self-sufficient and can deploy with all the personnel, equipment and supplies to execute the mission, which make them valuable to AMC’s rapid global mobility mission.

 

“CR forces are the answer to the question how do I move a large volume of air freight to anywhere in the world” said Nelson. “CR Forces are important to AMC and rapid global mobility because our units have the ability to deploy within 12 hours of notification to an austere location, furthermore we can support operations ranging from combat operations to humanitarian aid.”

Throughout the exercise CR forces were tested on their self-sufficient concept and were able to use C-Strike to exercise their rapid global mobility skills.

“It’s been great seeing our Airmen out here actually doing the mission and how well they do it and how prepared they are,” Rayner said. “C-Strike has shown us we need to work on our communication, but at the same time we have learned the many aspects of our mission that we perform well at.”