375th AES trains with Transportation Isolation System

Staff Sgt. Branden Beers, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron aeromedical evacuation technician, instructs Capt. Micheal Broome 375th AES flight nurse, on how to take off his paper suit while exiting a Transportation Isolation System used for training, Aug. 18, 2016. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Staff Sgt. Branden Beers, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron aeromedical evacuation technician, instructs Capt. Micheal Broome 375th AES flight nurse, on how to take off his paper suit while exiting a Transportation Isolation System used for training, Aug. 18, 2016. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Captains Micheal Broome and Nicole Ward, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron flight nurses, prepare Capt. Andrea De Oliveira, 375th AES flight nurse to enter a Transportation Isolation System for training, Aug. 18, 2016. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Captains Micheal Broome and Nicole Ward, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron flight nurses, prepare Capt. Andrea De Oliveira, 375th AES flight nurse to enter a Transportation Isolation System for training, Aug. 18, 2016. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Staff Sgt. Sean McCurbin, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron aeromedical evacuation technician, explores a Transportation Isolation System used for training, Aug. 18, 2016. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Staff Sgt. Sean McCurbin, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron aeromedical evacuation technician, explores a Transportation Isolation System used for training, Aug. 18, 2016. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Airman 1st Class Andrew Dominguez, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron aeromedical evacuation technician, prepares to enter the Transportation Isolation System for training, Aug. 18, 2016. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more difinitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Airman 1st Class Andrew Dominguez, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron aeromedical evacuation technician, prepares to enter the Transportation Isolation System for training, Aug. 18, 2016. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more difinitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Tech. Sgt. Renee San Nicolas, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron  aeromedical evacuation technician, connects air ducts to the Transporation Isolation System to provide air in and out of the TIS. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Tech. Sgt. Renee San Nicolas, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron aeromedical evacuation technician, connects air ducts to the Transporation Isolation System to provide air in and out of the TIS. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Airman Jeff Mcgee, 3rd Airlift Squadron loadmaster, ushers in a Transportation Isolation System onto a C-17 Globemaster from Dover Air Force Base at Scott Air Force Base on Aug. 18, 2016. The 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron used the TIS during training as a containment tool to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive treament without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S.Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Airman Jeff Mcgee, 3rd Airlift Squadron loadmaster, ushers in a Transportation Isolation System onto a C-17 Globemaster from Dover Air Force Base at Scott Air Force Base on Aug. 18, 2016. The 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron used the TIS during training as a containment tool to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive treament without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S.Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Capt. Carl Calimlim, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron flight nurse, trains other 375th AES personnel on the Transportation Isolation System, Aug. 18, 2016. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

Capt. Carl Calimlim, 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron flight nurse, trains other 375th AES personnel on the Transportation Isolation System, Aug. 18, 2016. The TIS is used to transport sick and contagious patients to more definitive care without compromising the safety of the crew. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Daniel Garcia)

SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. --

In September 2014, President Barack Obama sent over 3,000 military members to West Africa to help control and contain the Ebola outbreak.

Since then, the federal government has placed an importance on ensuring that military personnel who may come in contact with the Ebola virus are trained to respond properly.

Airmen with the 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron trained with the Transportation Isolation System Aug. 18-19 at Scott Air Force Base.

The TIS is a containment tool for medical personnel that allows them to move multiple patients exposed or infected with Ebola while also minimizing the risks to aircrew, medical attendants and the airframe. The TIS is a scalable system, composed of at least one isolation pallet for patient transportation and care.

It also has one pallet configured as an “antechamber” to provide medical members with an enclosed space to safely decontaminate and remove their personal protective equipment before exiting.

“What we essentially need to have is a hospital on an aircraft so we can treat them until we land,” said Brig. Gen. Lee Payne, an Air Mobility Command surgeon. “If we put our military in those situations, we need to be able to pull them out.”